CHAPTER 39
EXPULSION OF UNDESIRABLES ACT

[PRINCIPAL LEGISLATION]

ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS

   Section

Title

   1.   Short title.

   2.   Power to make expulsion order.

   3.   Detention pending decision of President.

   4.   Effect of expulsion order.

   5.   Contravention of expulsion order.

   6.   Power of President to order arrest and deportation.

   7.   Detention of person ordered to be deported.

   8.   Procedure where excuse or reason alleged for delay in complying with expulsion order.

   9.   Appointment and constitution of Board of Inquiry.

   10.   Board to report to the President.

   11.   [Repealed.]

   12.   Order of President upon consideration of report.

   13.   Cases in which recommendation for the deportation shall not have effect.

   14.   Duty of master of ship with regard to any person deported.

   15.   President may direct how expenses shall be defrayed.

   16.   Aiding and abetting.

   17.   Offences and penalties.

   18.   Evidence.

   19.   Any person detained pending President's decision may seek compensation to the High Court.

   20.   [Repealed.]

   21.   Restriction of jurisdiction of courts of law.

CHAPTER 39
THE EXPULSION OF UNDESIRABLES ACT

An Act to make provision for the expulsion of undesirable persons.

[14th March, 1930]

Ords. Nos.
15 of 1930
15 of 1940
[R.L. Cap. 39]
Acts Nos.
32 of 1994
12 of 1998

1.   Short title

   This Act may be cited as the Expulsion of Undesirables Act.

2.   Power to make expulsion order Ord. No. 15 of 1940 s. 2">

   (1) The President may make an expulsion order requiring any person not being a citizen of the United Republic to leave within the time fixed by the order, and thereafter so long as the order is in force to remain out of the United Republic, in the following cases–

   (a)   if the person has been convicted of a felony by a court other than a primary court and the court recommends that an expulsion order should be made against him either in addition to or in lieu of sentence; or

   (b)   if the President deems it to be conducive to the public good or advisable in the interests of public morals that an order should be made.

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please click here to subscribe to a subscription plan to view this part of the article.